Friday, September 08, 2006

Los Desaparecidos:

If Bill Clinton was our first black Presdient, then is it rapidly becoming clear that George W. Bush is our first Argentine. I have two kids, five and two. How do I explain this to them? How do I reconcile my hope that they are one day smart enough to ask "Dad, what did you do about it" with the fact that I don't have an answer? I'm starting to think I know how the Good Germans felt.

5 comments:

Tripp said...

Steve, you are verging over into the shrill category. Huzzah I say.

Brack said...

Well, I don't know what you're doing, but T is brushing up on his Mandarin so that he, for one, can welcome our new Chinese overlords.

Tripp said...

BTW Steve, I think the tide is turning.

http://www.warandpiece.com/blogdirs/004871.html

Steve said...

Yeah, Tripp, you are probably right. I'm just so frustrated with the (mainstream) media's tacit agreement that it is okay for the administration to lie to us. Fox, of course, gleefully piles on but Fox is a GOP infomercial so they don't really count. Apologies for the shrill tone of that post (although I do think the good German analogy is becoming more and more true for all of us).

On a more substantive level, there is an interesting and important debate to be had over whether and when to use torture. I for one am not such a pollyanna that I think it should be (or ever would be) off limits. I also don't agree that you forever cede the moral high ground if you torture a high level terrorist for information. Waterboarding Al Qaeda's number 2 is not the same as flying planes into the World Trade Center, whatever the moralists over at the Nation think.

But we do cede the high ground when we lie about it for years, then admit it and deny that the repeated, forcible near-drowning of a man is anything but torture. If we are going to torture suspects, or keep them in Guantanomo for years, or render them to Egypt and Pakistan, then we need to make the public case for the necessity of those actions, not hide behind hitherto unknown executive powers and glib arguments over what the definition of "is" is.

Argh.

Tripp said...

I recommend Mark Bowden's article on the subject.

http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200310/bowden

The widespread application of torture against random innocents in Iraq makes it highly difficult to support any torture related policy